EXHIBITION PROGRAMME 2015

2006 | 2007 | 2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015

Artist: Susanne Bojkovsky, Evelyn Corcoran, Cat Dobson, Kat Ennis, Heather Ann Garvey, Colette Langan, John Lyon, Michelle McGoldrick, Jim Maidment, Joanna Nulty, Megan O’Connor, John O’Kane, Fiona O’Shea, Peter Quinn, Emer Roban and Rachel Webb.

Title of Exhibition: ‘Insert_Title’

Date: Saturday 6th June - Saturday 13th June

About the Exhibition:

The third year graduates from IT Sligo are delighted to present a spicy selection of work from their degree year: ceramics, wood and paint; plant materials, plastic and glass; fabric, film and photos - there's bound to be something to interest or intrigue, and there may be something you've never imagined.

Artist's images and Statements

Susanne Bojkovsky: Susanne Bojkovsky grew up near the Bavarian Alpes and moved to Ireland in the mid eighties. Her work is largely informed by her love for nature, mainly maritime related. Being a thatcher also influences her work; it is sculptural, mostly made with recycled materials and the use of vibrant, sometimes loud colours. Susanne loves making "things" just for fun. Viewer, please feel free to "contextualise" her creations.

 

Evelyn Corcoran: As an artist, I am visually excited by the layering of textiles and fabrics which imitate natural forms. My work is based on exploring natural, organic forms along with biomorphic and organic abstraction while applying repetitive linear patterns. My subject matter arises from the microcosm to the macrocosm; patterns and flowing landscapes in biological geological realms. The resulting work is poised between the sublime and the absurd, incorporating elements of the real and the imagined, mimesis and abstraction.

 

Cat Dobson: The imagination is constant, and thus never lets up on your fuel to express yourself. Using the symbolism of jewelry and having a long-standing love for paint and its numerous qualities, I mostly paint in acrylics, but have become smitten with the many qualities of oils as well, taking great enjoyment in discovering new things about oil painting.  Qualities I use in my work are often bright, rich, sumptuous colours, either flat or flowing. The physicality of props and motifs is also a huge interest, having studied life drawing and representative illustration, for such aspects as conceptual portraiture that contain highly detailed motifs. I'm very focused on ethereal and fantastical atmospheres, being very interested in fantasy and narrative themes. I research and study motifs and references I'm interested in, and work both from life, and from my own imagination to create a marriage of fantasy and realism.

Kat Ennis: I am first and foremost a painter but my work also contains of sculptural aspects. I use collage, text and photo-realism in both small and large scale works in order to create large-scale installations. I enjoy the use of a vast range of materials and use anything at my disposal as a canvas on which to create my work. My style appears gritty and loose but the subject matter from which the theme of my work stems, is from a personal and calculated place and reflects my values on 'waste not want not'. My subject matter ranges from the sentimental to the political.

 

Heather Ann Garvey: Heather’s work is a hybrid of playfulness and tradition within the landscape. Experimenting with pop material, such as florescent pink and bright drawing tools. She contrast an earthy oil palette with her use of pop materials within her landscape paintings. She works to push these different materials past the association we may have into other areas. Heather’s rational is to combine these materials to create her own utopia of Irish landscape.

 

Colette Langan: The subject of this work is about an issue hidden in plain view – domestic violence.  I am challenging the stereotype that it is about weak bruised women.  Much of the abuse is about control and perpetrated at a mental and emotional level, the consistent feature is lack of respect.

John Lyon: The death of my son Luke Mathew Lyon aged 27 on January 30th 2015 mixed up emotions and the despair. These masks on a sterile background are other people’s emotions that I felt viewing as a third person. I am aware that the death of someone you do not know but is close to someone you do know is a strange situation to be in and in placing the masks on a white background may help people understand loss for there is never one answer just a tumult of ups and downs a fragility.

 

Jim Maidment: My work explores the interface between humans and the various objects or tools they handle; examining the patina those objects get through use and attempting to capture that intimate relationship with texture, line and colour. I admire hard-won skill wherever it is exhibited and I intend that my work pay tribute to those people who have taken the trouble to persevere.

 

 

Michelle McGoldrick: The inner strength of living things motivates me to paint the human form. I try to form a connection with human emotion and struggle in crisis. Working with life size paintings, using physical movement allows me to have a deeper connection and involvement with my work. I explore themes of identity crisis including annihilated identity and metamorphosis. Each painting attempts to become a unique expression of beauty, however there is a presence of an unsettling element to my work where all is not quite what it may seem. My work also addresses issues regarding the suppression of women and the control of the female being through psychological and physical abuse. While the themes I address are personal and important to me, my hope is that they will also connect with the struggles of the viewer.

 

Johanna Nulty: The topic of interest for my artwork is on the Illuminati. What I’m really interested in is the symbols and the secrecy behind the illuminati. My work includes drawing, print, painting, spray painting and lots of different materials. Important are the processes, the layering of the materials and using different methods. The conscious use of media, their textures and aesthetic, their presence, are important parts of the message conveyed.

Fiona O’Shea: Fiona O’Shea’s work takes a speculative view on mental health, the imagination and the concept of thought. She is very interested in psychology and the mind. O'Shea is very much a maker who likes to use various materials to create works in a non-conventional way. Her work has been in the Model, In Sligo, Where she ran a pseudo psychological themed, visual art instillation as part of the B.R.A. initiative.

Megan O’Connor: I wanted to focus on a real life issue, which is on-going every day in the world. Fortunately, I do not live in a war zone, and so can approach this theme in the only way I have witnessed it, in a journalistic fashion. I wanted to base my work around the emotions captured in the faces of people in these places and focus mainly on children. Creating pieces with a washy, nearly ghostly appearance so as to not be distasteful or blunt with such a sensitive subject.

John O'Kane: Within my practice I am engaged with process, I take into account cultural, political and environmental issues that have shaped our world today. My work is mainly mixed medium, ceramics, sculpture and wood. Constructed and engineered surfaces allow me to demonstrate strong outcomes. I also use recycled material that have a sense of historical value, there are many benefits from doing so, one in particular is the potential to unlock and rekindle a memory or event that happened in the past.

 

Fiona O’Shea: Fiona O’Shea’s work takes a speculative view on mental health, the imagination and the concept of thought. She is very interested in psychology and the mind. O'Shea is very much a maker who likes to use various materials to create works in a non-conventional way. Her work has been in the Model, In Sligo, Where she ran a pseudo psychological themed, visual art instillation as part of the B.R.A. initiative.

 

Peter Quinn: My painting preferences are varied and my influences would be taken from a wide variety of genres, from still life paintings of the Dutch masters of the Golden Age through their use of rich deep colour enhanced with dark shadows and intense light, Peter Claesz, Jacob Gillig, William Claeszoon Heda, to the abstract and varied works of Wassily Kandinsky and surrealism of Rene Magritte, I like to explore all genres and try to take influence from all rather than any particular style. Emer Roban As an artist, I work hard to develop painting and drawings that speak both to me and to others about the beauty and downsides to everyday life. They reference body identity, sexuality, fertility and today’s society. Before I start I ask myself the question what is it I want to get across to people I look into myself and my experiences and try to translate that into my work.
My Art delivers my experience in a colourful abstraction, helping me to express myself. Looking at renaissance and contemporary artists helped me to translate my journey in my work. 

Emer Roban: As an artist, I work hard to develop painting and drawings that speak both to me and to others about the beauty and downsides to everyday life. They reference body identity, sexuality, fertility and today’s society. Before I start I ask myself the question what is it I want to get across to people I look into myself and my experiences and try to translate that into my work. My Art delivers my experience in a colourful abstraction, helping me to express myself. Looking at renaissance and contemporary artists helped me to translate my journey in my work. 

Rachel Webb: How do we reach beyond the tunnel of our own ordinary perceptions and preconceptions to know/be known by the natural world? How do we deal with the threat of culture that measures the value of nature in terms of how many euros it can generate? Whilst asking these questions this work is primarily a celebration of an abiding love affair, inviting others to consider their own relationship with the non-human world.